Photo Essays

Along the mithi

Dylan Crawford, follows the river’s 18km journey from Vahir Lake to Mahim Bay, eventually emptying into the Arabian sea. The filth and squalor as seen from the Mithi’s point of view attempts to anthropomorphise the river that was once aptly named ‘sweet’ in the Marathi language.

(Dylan Crawford / Mumbai, India)

OSSIE AWARD 2019: BEST PHOTOJOURNALISM BY AN UNDERGRADUATE OR POSTGRADUATE STUDENT


THE MAN AND THE LAKE

The Man, has lived by the lake since 1991. Originally from the Kolar Gold fields, Srinivasal Reddy travelled just under 100 km west to Subramanya Kere to find work as a coolie ­– a general labourer. A friend gave him a bit of land to build a house. It wasn’t great land, but he made the most of it. The land was right by a section of the lake that flowed towards the city further downstream. The water by his house never stood still.

(Micah Coto / Bengaluru, India)


Ganesh Chhrapathi

The problem with the Ganesh Visaragen from an ecological standpoint however, is that many statues have been and are still made of plaster of Paris. PoP contains calcium sulphate hemihydrate, a substance that often takes years to break down. When it finally does, it reduces oxygen levels in the water making it uninhabitable for water-life. 

(Rhett Kleine / Bangalore, India)


SILK FROM THE SEWER

Wastewater, a common enough sight swirling through stormwater drains and snaking along gutters in the bustling city of Bengaluru, yet the 1400 million litres of wastewater produced each day is rich with untapped potential for a city rushing towards a water crisis. But local farmer Muniraju has turned the problem into an opportunity for local farmers

(Isabella Porras / Bangalore, India)


BRACING FOR THE MONSOON

A flash of light pierces the sky, then! CRACK! Lightning! The rumbles of thunder are quickly drowned out by the bellowing rain. Giant storm clouds are silhouetted amongst a chaotic light show in the sky. The streets outside the house burst to life as sewage channels by the road rapidly turn into rivers. Watching from the doorway, she hears the rain pelting the windows so hard she fears they might crack. She moves quickly, gathering her things. Her mother had said they needed to be ready.

(Micah Coto / Tamil Nadu, India)


LEOPARDS, WOLVES AND OTHER FOUL THINGS

The Tibetan Plateau, often referred to as the roof of the world. One can’t quite grasp the truth in this name until they see the snow-capped Himalaya disappearing amongst swathes of stark white clouds. The Changpa Nomads have called this dusty plateau home for more than a millennium. 

(Rhett Kleine / Ladakh, India)


EVICTED: PUSHING THE POOR TO THE FRINGES

You can see them in the distance – high-rises, apartment complexes, office buildings and shopping centres. Over time, more are built. They slowly grow closer and closer. The roads outside the village become busier as people flood the land and before you know it, you are surrounded. What was once glorious farmland on the outskirts of the city has become just another part of this concrete jungle. 

(Micah Coto / Bengaluru, India)


ONCE IN THE SERVICE OF KINGS

Dotted throughout Bangalore are dhobi ghats. Forests of sheets, shirts and pants. Row upon row nestled amongst Bangalore’s suburbia. Hiding among the flowing linen are detergent stained pools where the madiwala or dhobis go about their business. ‘Madiwala’ in Kannada means washermen. Traditionally the laundry men of Maharajas, the madiwala now service the laundry needs of hospitals, hotels and whoever else comes to them with bundles of washing in arm. 

(Rhett Kleine / Bangalore, India)


The Catch

The Catch: Chennai’s Fishing Community

(Rhett Kleine / Tamil Nadu, India)